Health

Stretch Your Way to Better Health

Stretching is an important part of life. Doing it regularly keeps us flexible and agile. For this Fit and Fab segment, we want to present to you a book that will help you reach your stretching goals. Here you will find out how you can stretch your way to better health. Stretch Therapy details the delightful realms of anatomy, physiology, and stretching! Included in the book are basic terms for you to become familiar with as you go through the chapters.  Each section opens with key words and thoughts that are important to the body areas that are being stretched. The author, Emily A. Francis, focuses on breathing practices to help you gain full access to your breath. Slow and steady breathing as you stretch allows you to bring added heat to your muscles when you exhale. She also instructs you not to hold your breath during any of the stretches. The book is filled with illustrations and color photographs demonstrating proper positioning for each stretch along with instructions. Included are individual stretches that range from floor, to standing, to chair stretched. There is also partner stretching with photos indicating the various stretches that are done with the aid of a partner. "I am a primary care physician and I see many patients having problems with musculo-skeletal issues. This is especially true after the weekend. Many patients with these problems are "weekend warriors" or just took on too much to do, while with others it is an aggravation of an ongoing recurring problem. But overall regardless of whether the problems are weekend related or occurring regularly, there is no doubt that if these patients had stretched adequately prior to their efforts and on a regular basis, they would be in a far better situation. And this is why I recommend this book and encourage adequate stretching to patients." ~ David M Reingold, M.D. To learn more about this book or to purchase a copy, you can click here or give us a call at 317-352-8200. About the Author Emily A. Francis has a B.S. in Exercise Science and Wellness from Jacksonville State University with a minor in nutrition. She also wrote, The Body Heals Itself. If you would like to know more about Cardinal Publishers Group, our distribution services, the books we distribute, or general information, you can contact us here or give us a call at 317-352-8200. One of our skilled representatives will be ready to help you. This blog has been brought to you by CPG News & Information Services.     The content was compiled by Ginger Bock


Read More 

Two Ways to Track Your Fitness and Running Progress

In this Fit and Fab segment we are talking about journaling. Keeping a journal of any kind helps us track the day and remember (hopefully with fondness) the events of that day. The following are two ways to track your fitness and running progress. One is with a fitness journal, and one is with a running journal. My Fitness Journal My Fitness Journal allows you to put structure into your workouts. Those who have a plan will find that they do not stagnate. This book encourages growth. My Fitness Journal has a hardcover which makes less likely to get damaged when traveling with it to the gym. It can take the wear-and tear of travel and still be useful. Inside, there are 365 days of entries where you can record your workout and the progress that you make. Additionally, you can place photos of yourself to see how you are developing through the year. Both fitness enthusiasts and newbies to the exercise world can enjoy watching themselves grow in health. Recording your progress will help to motivate you to continue with your fitness routine. Using My Fitness Journal can help you become fitter and healthier. Mike Diehl co-authored the book with Felix Grewe. Mike is a graduate trainer for performance sports. Felix is a German sports journalist, a tennis and fitness specialist in addition to training regularly using the methods of Mike Diehl.   Your Personal Running Journal Olympian, Jeff Galloway, has put together a running journal that details some “how to’s” for those who want to record their running progress. In Your Personal Running Journal, you will learn: How To Set up a training program Monitor your progress Schedule each workout Your Personal Running Journal also contains information on standard warm-ups, improvement drills to make running faster and easier, and it also offers information on troubleshooting performance and injuries. This 52-week journal is easy to use and analyze. Jeff Galloway was an average teenage runner who kept learning and working harder, until he became an Olympian. He is the author of the best-selling running book in North America (Galloway's Book on Running) and is a Runner's World columnist, as well as an inspirational speaker for more than 200 running and fitness sessions each year. He has worked with over 200,000 average people in training for specific goals and Galloway's quest for an injury-free marathon training program led him to develop group training programs in 1978. Galloway is the designer of the walk-run, low mileage marathon training program (Galloway RUN-WALK method) with an over 98% success rate.   If you would like to know more about Cardinal Publishers Group, our distribution services, the books we distribute, or general information, you can contact us here or give us a call at 317-352-8200. One of our skilled representatives will be ready to help you. This blog has been brought to you by CPG News & Information Services. Content of this blog was compiled by Ginger Bock


Read More 

Your Ancestors Didn’t Have Gyms, Computers, or Machines

In this Fit and Fab section, be inspired by function fitness expert, Lamar Lowery. he discusses the fact that our ancestors didn't have gyms, computers, or machines - they had functional fitness. He’s penned Functional Fitness and  co-authored Functional Fitness at Home . with Chris Lowery. Here he offers helpful hints to getting fabulously fit. By Lamar Lowery If we’re being honest, before the modern era, functional fitness was basically the only kind of fitness there was. Ancient humans hunted stuff and gathered stuff. That’s how they survived. If they couldn’t run fast enough to catch their prey or were not strong enough to wield their weapons they simply would not live. Ever hear of the phrase “survival of the fittest”? This is how the human race was able to evolve over millennia. Our bodies adapted to our environment and what we needed to do to survive. By training for functional fitness you are training your body the way it was designed to be used. If you are only training your body in a gym to get big muscles and look good, you are doing your body a disservice. Your muscles are supposed to be working together to accomplish tasks and movements. Isolating your biceps or triceps may help you add some mass to them, but you have to ask yourself: “why am I doing this”? I understand this may not be everyone’s mindset initially, but once you start training for fitness and overall health instead of just training to look good or impress other people you will reach a new level of understanding with your body.   Lamar Lowery is the author of Functional Fitness. This book provides intense workouts to reach maximum results. Detailed descriptions and photos make this an easy-to-understand guide for any personal trainer. In Lamar’s personal training sessions, he uses his expertise in endurance, coordination, and biomechanics to receive the best result.  Lamar was born in New York City and received sports scholarships for multiple colleges. He graduated as a Mental Health Specialist. In the late 1980's, he was transferred to a U.S. Army base in Germany. There he worked as an Army Physical Fitness Master. After he left the Army, he decided to stayed in Germany and built his own fitness academy.


Read More 

Understanding Fascia’s Role in Your Body

Fascia is a building network in our body that gives us support, structure, and form. Train Your Fascia Tone Your Body, offers you the successful method to form firm connective tissue.  Loaded with illustrated and detailed full-body workouts, this book presents toning for the seven important fascial chains. If your connective tissue is weak, this book will direct you in how to strengthen it. The following is an excerpt from the book. Until just a few years ago, only insiders were familiar with the fascia. Next to a few alternative manual therapists and some proverbial die-hard scientists only the meat industry was interested in that fibrous white stuff. After all, tender meat sells better than tough. Tender or tough, this question is essentially settled on the intramuscular connective tissue. A smaller group of chiropractors, led by the osteopaths, were already aware of muscular connective tissue in the last century.  The forefather of osteopathy, Andrew Taylor Still (1828-1917), had already attributed exceptional properties and profound knowledge was not founded on a specific scientific basis. From there, Dr. Ida Rolf, an American biochemist, developed Rolfing, a deep-tissue massage, which inspired manual therapists to apply myofascial techniques with remarkable healing effects. Still, from today’s point of view, the explanatory models used were outdated and not very convincing. From Cinderella organ to the limelight The whole body network is one of the most underestimated tissues in our body. Current research proves that the fascia forms an important basis for physical health and athletic performance ability. Scientific discoveries by international fascia researchers are generating ground breaking findings, resulting in a reorientation of sports performance and medical rehab. This also applies to all exercise programs that focus on health and physical fitness. The fascia participates in every movement – not just walking, dancing, and skipping, but also throwing and stretching. Healthy fascia structures form protective joint capsules, contribute to core stability and a strong back, and are responsible for the body’s muscle definition and contour. As a sensory organ they facilitate smooth, elegant movement, and they have a determining influence on how good and at home we feel in our bodies. So after years of neglect, there are plenty of reasons to pay more attention to this fascinating network.   Divo Mueller is a health practitioner and body therapist. She is known internationally as a pioneer of modern movement programs. Together with Robert Schleip, PhD, a renowned researcher of fascia, she has developed the successful training program Fascial Fitness. Karin Hertzer is a health journalist, PR consultant, and author. She has been engaged in several books and a number of publications, has successfully run the PR for Fascial Fitness Association and closely works together with Divo Mueller and Robert Schleip, PhD. Train Your Fascia Tone Your Body (Meyer & Meyer Sport 2017) is distributed by Cardinal Publishers Group.   For more information on Cardinal Publishers Group, you can contact us here or give us a call at 317-352-8200. This blog is brought to you by CPG News & Information Services


Read More 

How to Have a Healthy Holiday

Oh how we don't want to pack on the pounds or mistreat our bodies during the holidays, but there are so many goodies put in front of us. Mark Saunders, writer and 11 year cancer survivor and co-author of Prostate Cancer offers good advice on how to have a healthy holiday.  Restaurants during the Holidays Say, “No thank you” to the bread or chips and salsa that automatically arrive on your table. These high-glycemic carbs are metabolized like sugar. You are essentially “packing on the pounds” before your meal even arrives. Start your meals with a small salad. Salads usually arrive first and take the edge off your hunger, and your meal has a healthy start. Go with a simple olive oil and vinegar dressing. Instead of ordering an entree, consider ordering a couple of side dishes or something from the a la Carte menu. That way, you can get your vegetables and still feel satisfied. Avoid “all you can eat” buffet-style restaurants. They promote overeating. Skip dessert. You will feel lighter, look leaner, and have fewer health issues if you do. If having something for dessert feels better than staring at everyone as they indulge themselves, ask if fresh fruit is an option. Holiday Parties Eat a healthy mini-meal at home before you go. Include some veggies, protein, and healthy fats. Try a simple spring-mix salad with some chicken or canned tuna, with a couple of slices of avocado, a little tomato, and a vinaigrette dressing. It takes under 10 minutes to prepare. Bring a couple of glass bottles of sparkling water. Alcoholic beverages are the kings of “empty calories.” Alcohol is metabolized into fat in your liver. If you drink alcohol, alternate between alcoholic beverages and sparkling water. Arrive a little late. You’ll spend less time “grazing” the finger food and knocking back the eggnog. Bring your own healthy side dish or appetizer. That way, you have a go-to item — instead of filling up on nachos, chicken wings, seven-layer dip, cookies, candy, or fudge. When it’s time for pie, ask for a small slice, and savor it slowly. The Holidays at Work Bring your own lunch. This practice will save you $10-15/day, and gives you more control over what you eat. While this is a good year-round practice, it is especially helpful during the holidays when people bring in all the sweets they don’t want tempting them at home. Eat fewer crackers, cookies, and bread. You’ll lose weight and lower your insulin resistance. If you bring your own lunch, make yourself an open-faced sandwich. If you eat out, ask if they offer a lettuce wrap. Avoid sodas, colas, and energy drinks. If you feel run down, have an unsweetened cup of coffee or tea. If your job allows, take a 10-minute walk. It’s amazing what a short walk can do to clear your mind and restore your energy — especially when it’s cold outside. Bring your own bottled water (unless your work provides it). Think Flint, Michigan. Avoid the estrogenic compounds by drinking water from glass bottles (instead of plastic ones) whenever possible. Avoid crashing and burning by keeping a ready supply of healthy snacks in your desk, locker, car, or work refrigerator. Nuts, seeds, low-glycemic fruit, hard-boiled eggs, and bottled water will keep you from being a frequent visitor at the break room holiday snack table.   Mark B. Saunders is a writer, editor, publisher, public speaker, and 11-year cancer survivor. As an active surveillance prostate cancer patient, Mark did not receive traditional treatment like surgery or some form of radiation. Instead, he dramatically overhauled his lifestyle and his cancer went away and hasn’t come back since. As a prostate cancer survivor, Mark has dedicated his life to sharing what he has learned about health and wellness. A journey that he calls, Inside out, round-about, and back again. Mark is the co-author of Prostate Cancer: A New Approach to Treatment and Healing and Do You Have Prostate Cancer: A Compact Guide to Diagnosis and Health    


Read More 

Diagnosing Prostate Cancer

Thanks to new blood and urine biomarkers and improvements in MRI imaging, diagnosing prostate cancer has become easier and more accurate than ever before. For most men, however, detecting prostate cancer still begins with a digital rectal exam and a PSA blood test. If you are a man over 45, don’t let anyone talk you out of getting an annual digital rectal exam and a PSA test. Yes, it’s true. Both of these tests are “old school” and imprecise, but they remain the front line of defense against prostate cancer. These two tests are usually performed during a routine physical or because a man is experiencing urinary symptoms such as: Waking up in the middle of the night to pee (Nocturia) Urinary frequency (having to pee more often than normal) Urinary urgency (must pee NOW!) Low flow (weak urine stream) Painful urination (Dysuria) Difficulty peeing or emptying your bladder Itching/burning during urination These symptoms can be caused by advanced prostate cancer and four non-threatening conditions: Prostatitis (prostate inflammation/infection) Enlarged Prostate (BPH) Pelvic Floor Dysfunction (urinary sphincter) Urinary strictures (scar tissue in the urethra) It’s a doctor’s job to figure out which condition (or conditions) is causing a man’s elevated PSA numbers or any of the symptoms above. Ten years ago, if a man had a higher than normal PSA number (with or without any of the symptoms described above), he was an automatic candidate for a prostate biopsy. This type of needle biopsy involves shooting 10-20 needles through the wall of the rectum, into the prostate, to take tissue samples from the prostate. If this procedure sounds demoralizing, it feels worse. Even when the local anesthetic works correctly, a prostate biopsy feels like what it is: a bunch of needles being shot through your rectum and into your prostate — not a holiday. I’ve had three of these biopsies. During the last one, the surgeon botched the local anesthetic, so it felt like a knife fight was going on in my backside. A week after that biopsy, I developed sepsis (a systemic blood infection), which almost killed me. The ER doctor said I was 6-12 hours away from complete organ failure. So it’s easy to understand why avoiding a prostate biopsy is a good idea — unless other tests indicate a biopsy is needed. Thanks to dozens of blood and urine biomarker tests, doctors have a new arsenal of tools that pick up where PSA testing leaves off. An abnormally high PSA number tells you that something is wrong, but it doesn’t tell you what. It could be cancer or an infection or an enlarged prostate or something else.   A blood test like the 4KscoreTest identifies biomarkers for advanced prostate cancer, and urine tests like PCA3 or SelectMDx can accurately identify men who should have a prostate biopsy because of an increased risk of finding cancer during a biopsy. Multi-parametric MRI combines four different types of imaging (anatomic, metabolic, diffusion weighted, and dynamic contrast enhanced) to deliver a more accurate picture of the prostate — and any areas that contain cancer. When used before a prostate biopsy, multi-parametric MRI can accurately identify suspicious areas of the prostate for a “targeted biopsy,” which is 70-75 percent more likely to detect cancer than a standard biopsy, if cancer is present. In other words, a multi-parametric MRI does a much better job of finding prostate cancer. Both blood/urine biomarkers and multi-parametric MRI give doctors better tools to locate prostate cancer (if it is there) or rule it out (if it’s not). In the next blog, we’ll look at how to pair the right type of treatment with the kind of prostate cancer a man has.       Mark B. Saunders is a writer, editor, publisher, public speaker, and 11-year cancer survivor. As an active surveillance prostate cancer patient, Mark did not receive traditional treatment like surgery or some form of radiation. Instead, he dramatically overhauled his lifestyle and his cancer went away and hasn’t come back since. As a prostate cancer survivor, Mark has dedicated his life to sharing what he has learned about health and wellness. A journey that he calls, Inside out, round-about, and back again. Mark is the co-author of Prostate Cancer: A New Approach to Treatment and Healing and Do You Have Prostate Cancer: A Compact Guide to Diagnosis and Health 


Read More 

Prostate Cancer Prevention, Part II

“If one wishes for good health, one must first ask oneself if he is ready to do away with the reasons for his illness. Only then is it possible to help him.”    — Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine (460-375 bce) The four areas of prevention discussed in this blog (proper structural alignment, reduced environmental toxins, healthy hormone balance, and having a reason to live) all play a big part in living a vibrant and vital life — not to mention having a healthy prostate. Proper Structural Alignment One of the keys to a happy prostate is having a healthy lower back. From your prostate’s prospective, the best way to have a solid structural alignment in your pelvis begins with a healthy lower back and sacrum (the bone at the base of our spine). Good posture, supportive discs, strong yet supple muscles and connective tissues all play important roles in keeping your pelvis in a “neutral” position with minimal stress and strain on your pelvic floor. Your pelvic floor is the “hammock” of muscles and connective tissue that hold all the organs of your pelvis in place. If your pelvic floor is too tight, too lose, or too tight in some places and too loose in others, then you’re going to have prostate problems. It’s as simple as that. If you’ve ever hurt your lower back or if your lower back feels “temperamental,” then you probably have a misaligned pelvis and an out-of-balance pelvic floor, which often results in an unhappy prostate. What’s the best way to improve the health of your pelvic floor, and therefore your prostate? A knowledgeable physical therapist or personal trainer who understands the right exercises to strengthen and open your lower back and pelvis is your best bet. Reduced Environmental Toxins Environmental toxins are everywhere, so how do you protect yourself from them? Simple: Don’t let them into your home. Get rid of the Round Up, dispose of any cleaning products that contain chemicals you cannot pronounce, remove all cleaning solvents, stop using insecticide sprays, and quit bleaching your sheets. It’s also a good idea to see if your shampoo, conditioner, soap, or lotion contain parabens or phthalates. If they do, throw them out and get new ones. Also, stop using insecticide “house bombs.” Those chemicals remain in your home for months (or years), which is good for killing bugs, but bad for your overall health — and your prostate.   Healthy Hormone Balance A healthy testosterone level for men is in the “sweet spot” (500-900 ng/dl) right in the middle of the normal range (300-1050 ng/dl). Unfortunately, a man’s testosterone levels peak when he is about 20, and slowly decline by about 10 percent per decade — which can lead to a lower sex drive and loss of libido. What also leads to a lower libido is having a low testosterone/estrogen ratio. Yes, men have some estrogen in their bodies. That’s normal. What you want to avoid is when your testosterone levels fall and your estrogen levels rise. Men with low “T” and high “E” tend to have difficulty in the bedroom and also develop the most aggressive kinds of prostate cancer. How can you raise your T levels and lower you E levels? Stop eating soy foods (soybeans, tofu, tempeh, miso, edamame, soy milk, and soy protein in all sorts of vegetarian foods) Stop drinking beer (The hops in beer is highly “estrogenic.”) Avoid flax, flax seeds, and flax meal (Also, highly estrogenic.) Cut out sesame seeds, tahini, and hummus Go easy on the beans and peas (legumes) Stop drinking beverages in plastic bottles (The drinking water and other beverages in plastic bottles leach the estrogenic compounds into the liquid.) Having a Reason to Live Passion is the difference between “surviving” and “thriving,” “fun” and “fantastic.” What’s your passion? Is it your partner, your children, grandchildren, family, hobbies, work, friends, sports, a cause, your pets, making music … Whatever it is, hang on to it. Everyone needs a daily hit of that passionate feeling of being vibrant and fully alive. If you don’t have that feeling of passion in your life today, I invite you on a journey to find it. Chances are, you won’t have to look too far.   Mark B. Saunders is a writer, editor, publisher, public speaker, and 11-year cancer survivor. As an active surveillance prostate cancer patient, Mark did not receive traditional treatment like surgery or some form of radiation. Instead, he dramatically overhauled his lifestyle and his cancer went away and hasn’t come back since. As a prostate cancer survivor, Mark has dedicated his life to sharing what he has learned about health and wellness. A journey that he calls, Inside out, round-about, and back again. Mark is the co-author of Prostate Cancer: A New Approach to Treatment and Healing and Do You Have Prostate Cancer: A Compact Guide to Diagnosis and Health  September is National Prostate Health Month. Do what you can to stay healthy.  


Read More 

Prostate Cancer Prevention, Part I

By Mark Saunders “A healthy prostate cannot exist in an unhealthy body.” — Dr. Jesse Stoff, M.D. “Prevention is bunk!” That’s what a prominent urologist shouted at the presenter during a prostate cancer symposium I attended recently. The audience chuckled politely, but I wanted to stand up and shout back, “No, it’s not.” But I was a guest at this symposium, and I’m not a doctor, so it wasn’t a level playing field. As an 11-year prostate cancer survivor who has co-written two books on the topic, however, I do have a few words to say about prostate cancer prevention. Basically, the same 8 things that keep your entire body healthy also keep your prostate healthy. Here they are: Diet & Nutrition Exercise Stress Management Rest & Sleep Proper Structural Alignment Reduced Environmental Toxins Healthy Hormone Balance Having a Reason to Live Diet & Nutrition Approximately 80 percent of your health begins with what’s on the end of your fork. If you are eating a low-inflammatory diet that is full of fresh vegetables (especially cruciferous vegetables), lean protein, and healthy fats (olive oil, almond oil, and coconut oil) — and low on sweeteners, desserts, grains, dairy, bread, pasta, crackers, legumes, and most nuts — then you’re off to a good start. If not, it’s time to make some changes. Exercise Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine, said, “Walking is the best medicine.” He was right. James Brown sang, “Get up offa that thing, and dance ‘till you feel better.” He was right too. Whether it’s at a desk, in a car, on a bus, in front of the TV … we all sit way too much. (I’m sitting right now as I write this blog.) Human beings were meant to move. Our ancestors were hunter/gathers, which cannot be done from a seated position. If you have a job that requires you to sit for long periods at a time, set an alarm and get up and move every hour for at least five minutes. Even better, take a walk for 30 minutes during your lunch break. Better yet, get 30 minutes of strenuous exercise every day — the kind that makes you breathe hard. Stress Management If you want to pack on the fat, have your doctor inject you with insulin or hydrocortisone (cortisol). Cortisol is a steroid hormone that your body naturally releases during periods of stress. If you’re under stress, you body is releasing a lot of cortisol, which signals your body to store fat. The easiest way to reduce any kind of stress is deep breathing. Try it. For the next two minutes, I invite you to breathe deeply. At the end of two minutes, ask yourself if you still feel stressed. Rest & Sleep Study after medical study show that people who get less than 6 hours of sleep a night think their brains are functioning normally, but they consistently score lower on cognitive test than they do when they get 8 hours of sleep. The scores on these tests are even worse for people have consecutive nights of less than 6 hours of sleep. Coincidence? I think not. In order to have a healthy body, mind, and prostate, you need a full night’s sleep — that’s more than 6 hours. In other words, turn the TV off, put the novel down, say “good night” to your Facebook friends, and go to bed. I will cover Points 5-8 in Part II of this blog.   Mark B. Saunders is a writer, editor, publisher, public speaker, and 11-year cancer survivor. As an active surveillance prostate cancer patient, Mark did not receive traditional treatment like surgery or some form of radiation. Instead, he dramatically overhauled his lifestyle and his cancer went away and hasn’t come back since. As a prostate cancer survivor, Mark has dedicated his life to sharing what he has learned about health and wellness. A journey that he calls, Inside out, round-about, and back again. Mark is the co-author of Prostate Cancer: A New Approach to Treatment and Healing and Do You Have Prostate Cancer: A Compact Guide to Diagnosis and Health  September is National Prostate Health Month. Do what you can to stay healthy.


Read More 

September Is National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

By Mark Saunders As a prostate cancer survivor and co-author of two books on the subject, I think it’s important to bring a little “awareness” to National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. The art and science of prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment are changing rapidly. For example, in July of this year, the New England Journal of Medicine published an article stating that the 10-year mortality rate for men with low-risk, low-volume, prostate cancer who elected to “observe” their cancer (In this study, observation ranged from doing nothing to making drastic lifestyle changes.) and those who had a “radical prostatectomy” (surgery) had statistically similar outcomes. In other words, approximately the same number of men died in both groups. Fifteen years ago, that information would have been considered heresy, and any doctor who prescribed “observation” to their prostate cancer patients would have been sued for malpractice and drummed out of the profession. Today, it’s state-of-the-art information. The general consensus on PSA testing has flip-flopped from “heaven sent” to a test that promotes too many invasive procedures like prostate biopsies and surgeries (which can leave men with lifelong “harms” such as incontinence and sexual dysfunction) to a good first line of defense against prostate cancer that signals there’s a problem going on in the prostate — without identifying what the problem actually is. Today, there several new highly specific biomarker tests that pick up where PSA testing leaves off (PCA3, SelectMDx, and 4Kscore). These blood and urine tests can identify whether a man is likely to have prostate cancer or not; eliminating the need to jump straight from an elevated PSA test to a prostate biopsy. If you or someone you know recently had a higher than normal PSA test, please let them know about these recent advances in biomarker testing. There are also several new tests that enhance a prostate biopsy’s ability to detect the presence of prostate cancer — especially if the biopsy results come back negative (25% of negative biopsies are “false negatives”). Even if the biopsy comes back positive for low-grade, low-risk prostate cancer, there are additional tests to determine if the cancer really truly is “low-grade, low-risk” — or if it is more aggressive (a wolf in sheep’s clothing). This type of leading-edge information provides men (and the people who love them) with the ability to make smart prostate treatment decisions. Without this kind of information, people are likely to make their treatment decisions based on whatever the first doctor they see tells them to do. In my opinion, National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month ought to begin with helping men become aware of their treatment options based on the kind of cancer (or other prostate condition) they have.   Mark B. Saunders is a writer, editor, publisher, public speaker, and 11-year cancer survivor. As an active surveillance prostate cancer patient, Mark did not receive traditional treatment like surgery or some form of radiation. Instead, he dramatically overhauled his lifestyle and his cancer went away and hasn't come back since. As a prostate cancer survivor, Mark has dedicated his life to sharing what he has learned about health and wellness. A journey that he calls, Inside out, round-about, and back again.


Read More 

Calm Yourself with Calming Foods

Calm Yourself with Calming Foods Neurotransmitters are the brain chemicals that communicate information throughout your brain and body. The brain uses neurotransmitters to tell your heart to beat, your lungs to breathe, and your stomach to digest. They can also affect mood, sleep, concentration, weight, and can cause adverse symptoms when they are out of balance. Neurotransmitter levels can be depleted many ways. It is estimated that 86% of Americans have suboptimal neurotransmitter levels. Stress, poor diet--protein deficiency, poor digestion, poor blood sugar control, drug (prescription and recreational), alcohol and caffeine can deplete them. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that is found in the gastrointestinal tract, nervous system and blood platelets. It helps to regulate mood, appetite, sleep, and also supports memory and learning. Studies show an association between serotonin levels and mood. The good news is you can naturally increase your serotonin levels with food instead of drugs. • Complex carbohydrates, such as sweet potatoes, brown rice, oatmeal, amaranth, buckwheat, millet and quinoa allow your brain to process more serotonin. • Eating protein and healthy omega-3 fats, found in fish, walnuts and flax, will also improve mood. • B vitamins, which are abundant in fresh leafy greens and in chemical-free, pasture-raised meat, are another important factor because they're needed for serotonin production. • Leafy greens, such as spinach, kale, collard greens, are high in folic acid, a B vitamin. Low levels are linked to depression. • Bananas contain vitamin B6. They are high in potassium, an important electrolyte for a happy and calm mind. • Other foods rich in vitamin B6: turnip greens, garlic, cauliflower, mustard greens celery, fish, poultry, and lean beef. • Tryptophan is the precursor to serotonin; these foods are high in tryptophan: turkey, sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds. • Fermented foods such as sauerkraut, yogurt, miso, and Kombucha, pickled foods (beets, radish, Korean kimchi) assist in digestion and assimilation of the important nutrients you need for serotonin. So try some of these foods and notice if you feel more relaxed and uplifted. Bon appetite! To receive more helpful tips for caregivers, pick up your copy of Barbra's book Calmer Waters. You can also visit Barbra at her website: https://barbracohn.com/     This blog has been brought to you by CPG News & Information Services.


Read More