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Diagnosing Prostate Cancer



Thanks to new blood and urine biomarkers and improvements in MRI imaging, diagnosing prostate cancer has become easier and more accurate than ever before. For most men, however, detecting prostate cancer still begins with a digital rectal exam and a PSA blood test. If you are a man over 45, don’t let anyone talk you out of getting an annual digital rectal exam and a PSA test. Yes, it’s true. Both of these tests are “old school” and imprecise, but they remain the front line of defense against prostate cancer. These two tests are usually performed during a routine physical or because a man is experiencing urinary symptoms such as: Waking up in the middle of the night to pee (Nocturia) Urinary frequency (having to pee more often than normal) Urinary urgency (must pee NOW!) Low flow (weak urine stream) Painful urination (Dysuria) Difficulty peeing or emptying your bladder Itching/burning during urination These symptoms can be caused by advanced prostate cancer and four non-threatening conditions: Prostatitis (prostate inflammation/infection) Enlarged Prostate (BPH) Pelvic Floor Dysfunction (urinary sphincter) Urinary strictures (scar tissue in the urethra) It’s a doctor’s job to figure out which condition (or conditions) is causing a man’s elevated PSA numbers or any of the symptoms above. Ten years ago, if a man had a higher than normal PSA number (with or without any of the symptoms described above), he was an automatic candidate for a prostate biopsy. This type of needle biopsy involves shooting 10-20 needles through the wall of the rectum, into the prostate, to take tissue samples from the prostate. If this procedure sounds demoralizing, it feels worse. Even when the local anesthetic works correctly, a prostate biopsy feels like what it is: a bunch of needles being shot through your rectum and into your prostate — not a holiday. I’ve had three of these biopsies. During the last one, the surgeon botched the local anesthetic, so it felt like a knife fight was going on in my backside. A week after that biopsy, I developed sepsis (a systemic blood infection), which almost killed me. The ER doctor said I was 6-12 hours away from complete organ failure. So it’s easy to understand why avoiding a prostate biopsy is a good idea — unless other tests indicate a biopsy is needed. Thanks to dozens of blood and urine biomarker tests, doctors have a new arsenal of tools that pick up where PSA testing leaves off. An abnormally high PSA number tells you that something is wrong, but it doesn’t tell you what. It could be cancer or an infection or an enlarged prostate or something else.   A blood test like the 4KscoreTest identifies biomarkers for advanced prostate cancer, and urine tests like PCA3 or SelectMDx can accurately identify men who should have a prostate biopsy because of an increased risk of finding cancer during a biopsy. Multi-parametric MRI combines four different types of imaging (anatomic, metabolic, diffusion weighted, and dynamic contrast enhanced) to deliver a more accurate picture of the prostate — and any areas that contain cancer. When used before a prostate biopsy, multi-parametric MRI can accurately identify suspicious areas of the prostate for a “targeted biopsy,” which is 70-75 percent more likely to detect cancer than a standard biopsy, if cancer is present. In other words, a multi-parametric MRI does a much better job of finding prostate cancer. Both blood/urine biomarkers and multi-parametric MRI give doctors better tools to locate prostate cancer (if it is there) or rule it out (if it’s not). In the next blog, we’ll look at how to pair the right type of treatment with the kind of prostate cancer a man has.       Mark B. Saunders is a writer, editor, publisher, public speaker, and 11-year cancer survivor. As an active surveillance prostate cancer patient, Mark did not receive traditional treatment like surgery or some form of radiation. Instead, he dramatically overhauled his lifestyle and his cancer went away and hasn’t come back since. As a prostate cancer survivor, Mark has dedicated his life to sharing what he has learned about health and wellness. A journey that he calls, Inside out, round-about, and back again. Mark is the co-author of Prostate Cancer: A New Approach to Treatment and Healing and Do You Have Prostate Cancer: A Compact Guide to Diagnosis and Health 


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Cardinal Publishers Group Teams Up with L&L Pardey Publications



Cardinal Publishers Group is now distributing L&L Pardey Publications, publishers of nautical books about cruising adventures, designing sailboats, crossing oceans, surviving storms, and voyaging with children.  “I have been an avid reader of the Pardeys’ sailing adventures for many years.  As we make a commitment to developing a fleet of nautical publishers I can’t think of a better line to start with than L & L Pardey Publications,” states Cardinal Publishers Group president Tom Doherty. We are proud to announce that Cardinal Publishers Group teams up with L&L Pardey Publications.  Lin and Larry Pardey have been considered the first couple of the cruising lifestyle for decades.  Sailing around the world in boats of their own design and construction has given them the opportunity to share both their adventures and knowledge with more than one generation of seafarers and armchair cruisers alike.  Cardinal Publishers Group (CPG) has been distributing adult non-fiction publishers since 2000 and expects to add several new nautical lines before the end of 2017.  To that end, CPG will be sharing booth M5 with L & L Pardey Publications at the upcoming United States Sailboat Show this October 5 - 9 in Annapolis, Maryland.  “I am excited to be working with Tom and his team. The US Sailboat show at Annapolis  is more than just a boat show, it is the gathering place of some of the best writers and thinkers of the nautical world and a perfect opportunity to introduce CPG’s new endeavors.” Lin Pardey stated. The US Sailboat Show in Annapolis attracts sailors from around the globe.  Beyond the beautiful sailboats on display during the show, there are many hours of instructional and storytelling seminars.  It is the seminal event each year for sailors, and the publishers and distributors that help tell their stories. We are dedicated to achieving excellence in distribution services for our client publishers and providing first-rate customer care to the individuals and corporations that buy our publishers’ books. To find out more about L & L Pardey Publications and Cardinal Publishers Group and their participation in the US Sailboat Show, contact Ginger Bock at Cardinal Publishers Group at gbock@caridnalpub.com or call 800-296-0481 or outside the US 317-352-8200.   This has been brought to you by CPG News & Information Services. For more information you can contact us or give us a call at 317-352-8200.  


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Prostate Cancer Prevention, Part II



“If one wishes for good health, one must first ask oneself if he is ready to do away with the reasons for his illness. Only then is it possible to help him.”    — Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine (460-375 bce) The four areas of prevention discussed in this blog (proper structural alignment, reduced environmental toxins, healthy hormone balance, and having a reason to live) all play a big part in living a vibrant and vital life — not to mention having a healthy prostate. Proper Structural Alignment One of the keys to a happy prostate is having a healthy lower back. From your prostate’s prospective, the best way to have a solid structural alignment in your pelvis begins with a healthy lower back and sacrum (the bone at the base of our spine). Good posture, supportive discs, strong yet supple muscles and connective tissues all play important roles in keeping your pelvis in a “neutral” position with minimal stress and strain on your pelvic floor. Your pelvic floor is the “hammock” of muscles and connective tissue that hold all the organs of your pelvis in place. If your pelvic floor is too tight, too lose, or too tight in some places and too loose in others, then you’re going to have prostate problems. It’s as simple as that. If you’ve ever hurt your lower back or if your lower back feels “temperamental,” then you probably have a misaligned pelvis and an out-of-balance pelvic floor, which often results in an unhappy prostate. What’s the best way to improve the health of your pelvic floor, and therefore your prostate? A knowledgeable physical therapist or personal trainer who understands the right exercises to strengthen and open your lower back and pelvis is your best bet. Reduced Environmental Toxins Environmental toxins are everywhere, so how do you protect yourself from them? Simple: Don’t let them into your home. Get rid of the Round Up, dispose of any cleaning products that contain chemicals you cannot pronounce, remove all cleaning solvents, stop using insecticide sprays, and quit bleaching your sheets. It’s also a good idea to see if your shampoo, conditioner, soap, or lotion contain parabens or phthalates. If they do, throw them out and get new ones. Also, stop using insecticide “house bombs.” Those chemicals remain in your home for months (or years), which is good for killing bugs, but bad for your overall health — and your prostate.   Healthy Hormone Balance A healthy testosterone level for men is in the “sweet spot” (500-900 ng/dl) right in the middle of the normal range (300-1050 ng/dl). Unfortunately, a man’s testosterone levels peak when he is about 20, and slowly decline by about 10 percent per decade — which can lead to a lower sex drive and loss of libido. What also leads to a lower libido is having a low testosterone/estrogen ratio. Yes, men have some estrogen in their bodies. That’s normal. What you want to avoid is when your testosterone levels fall and your estrogen levels rise. Men with low “T” and high “E” tend to have difficulty in the bedroom and also develop the most aggressive kinds of prostate cancer. How can you raise your T levels and lower you E levels? Stop eating soy foods (soybeans, tofu, tempeh, miso, edamame, soy milk, and soy protein in all sorts of vegetarian foods) Stop drinking beer (The hops in beer is highly “estrogenic.”) Avoid flax, flax seeds, and flax meal (Also, highly estrogenic.) Cut out sesame seeds, tahini, and hummus Go easy on the beans and peas (legumes) Stop drinking beverages in plastic bottles (The drinking water and other beverages in plastic bottles leach the estrogenic compounds into the liquid.) Having a Reason to Live Passion is the difference between “surviving” and “thriving,” “fun” and “fantastic.” What’s your passion? Is it your partner, your children, grandchildren, family, hobbies, work, friends, sports, a cause, your pets, making music … Whatever it is, hang on to it. Everyone needs a daily hit of that passionate feeling of being vibrant and fully alive. If you don’t have that feeling of passion in your life today, I invite you on a journey to find it. Chances are, you won’t have to look too far.   Mark B. Saunders is a writer, editor, publisher, public speaker, and 11-year cancer survivor. As an active surveillance prostate cancer patient, Mark did not receive traditional treatment like surgery or some form of radiation. Instead, he dramatically overhauled his lifestyle and his cancer went away and hasn’t come back since. As a prostate cancer survivor, Mark has dedicated his life to sharing what he has learned about health and wellness. A journey that he calls, Inside out, round-about, and back again. Mark is the co-author of Prostate Cancer: A New Approach to Treatment and Healing and Do You Have Prostate Cancer: A Compact Guide to Diagnosis and Health  September is National Prostate Health Month. Do what you can to stay healthy.  


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Prostate Cancer Prevention, Part I



By Mark Saunders “A healthy prostate cannot exist in an unhealthy body.” — Dr. Jesse Stoff, M.D. “Prevention is bunk!” That’s what a prominent urologist shouted at the presenter during a prostate cancer symposium I attended recently. The audience chuckled politely, but I wanted to stand up and shout back, “No, it’s not.” But I was a guest at this symposium, and I’m not a doctor, so it wasn’t a level playing field. As an 11-year prostate cancer survivor who has co-written two books on the topic, however, I do have a few words to say about prostate cancer prevention. Basically, the same 8 things that keep your entire body healthy also keep your prostate healthy. Here they are: Diet & Nutrition Exercise Stress Management Rest & Sleep Proper Structural Alignment Reduced Environmental Toxins Healthy Hormone Balance Having a Reason to Live Diet & Nutrition Approximately 80 percent of your health begins with what’s on the end of your fork. If you are eating a low-inflammatory diet that is full of fresh vegetables (especially cruciferous vegetables), lean protein, and healthy fats (olive oil, almond oil, and coconut oil) — and low on sweeteners, desserts, grains, dairy, bread, pasta, crackers, legumes, and most nuts — then you’re off to a good start. If not, it’s time to make some changes. Exercise Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine, said, “Walking is the best medicine.” He was right. James Brown sang, “Get up offa that thing, and dance ‘till you feel better.” He was right too. Whether it’s at a desk, in a car, on a bus, in front of the TV … we all sit way too much. (I’m sitting right now as I write this blog.) Human beings were meant to move. Our ancestors were hunter/gathers, which cannot be done from a seated position. If you have a job that requires you to sit for long periods at a time, set an alarm and get up and move every hour for at least five minutes. Even better, take a walk for 30 minutes during your lunch break. Better yet, get 30 minutes of strenuous exercise every day — the kind that makes you breathe hard. Stress Management If you want to pack on the fat, have your doctor inject you with insulin or hydrocortisone (cortisol). Cortisol is a steroid hormone that your body naturally releases during periods of stress. If you’re under stress, you body is releasing a lot of cortisol, which signals your body to store fat. The easiest way to reduce any kind of stress is deep breathing. Try it. For the next two minutes, I invite you to breathe deeply. At the end of two minutes, ask yourself if you still feel stressed. Rest & Sleep Study after medical study show that people who get less than 6 hours of sleep a night think their brains are functioning normally, but they consistently score lower on cognitive test than they do when they get 8 hours of sleep. The scores on these tests are even worse for people have consecutive nights of less than 6 hours of sleep. Coincidence? I think not. In order to have a healthy body, mind, and prostate, you need a full night’s sleep — that’s more than 6 hours. In other words, turn the TV off, put the novel down, say “good night” to your Facebook friends, and go to bed. I will cover Points 5-8 in Part II of this blog.   Mark B. Saunders is a writer, editor, publisher, public speaker, and 11-year cancer survivor. As an active surveillance prostate cancer patient, Mark did not receive traditional treatment like surgery or some form of radiation. Instead, he dramatically overhauled his lifestyle and his cancer went away and hasn’t come back since. As a prostate cancer survivor, Mark has dedicated his life to sharing what he has learned about health and wellness. A journey that he calls, Inside out, round-about, and back again. Mark is the co-author of Prostate Cancer: A New Approach to Treatment and Healing and Do You Have Prostate Cancer: A Compact Guide to Diagnosis and Health  September is National Prostate Health Month. Do what you can to stay healthy.


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September Is National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month



By Mark Saunders As a prostate cancer survivor and co-author of two books on the subject, I think it’s important to bring a little “awareness” to National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. The art and science of prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment are changing rapidly. For example, in July of this year, the New England Journal of Medicine published an article stating that the 10-year mortality rate for men with low-risk, low-volume, prostate cancer who elected to “observe” their cancer (In this study, observation ranged from doing nothing to making drastic lifestyle changes.) and those who had a “radical prostatectomy” (surgery) had statistically similar outcomes. In other words, approximately the same number of men died in both groups. Fifteen years ago, that information would have been considered heresy, and any doctor who prescribed “observation” to their prostate cancer patients would have been sued for malpractice and drummed out of the profession. Today, it’s state-of-the-art information. The general consensus on PSA testing has flip-flopped from “heaven sent” to a test that promotes too many invasive procedures like prostate biopsies and surgeries (which can leave men with lifelong “harms” such as incontinence and sexual dysfunction) to a good first line of defense against prostate cancer that signals there’s a problem going on in the prostate — without identifying what the problem actually is. Today, there several new highly specific biomarker tests that pick up where PSA testing leaves off (PCA3, SelectMDx, and 4Kscore). These blood and urine tests can identify whether a man is likely to have prostate cancer or not; eliminating the need to jump straight from an elevated PSA test to a prostate biopsy. If you or someone you know recently had a higher than normal PSA test, please let them know about these recent advances in biomarker testing. There are also several new tests that enhance a prostate biopsy’s ability to detect the presence of prostate cancer — especially if the biopsy results come back negative (25% of negative biopsies are “false negatives”). Even if the biopsy comes back positive for low-grade, low-risk prostate cancer, there are additional tests to determine if the cancer really truly is “low-grade, low-risk” — or if it is more aggressive (a wolf in sheep’s clothing). This type of leading-edge information provides men (and the people who love them) with the ability to make smart prostate treatment decisions. Without this kind of information, people are likely to make their treatment decisions based on whatever the first doctor they see tells them to do. In my opinion, National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month ought to begin with helping men become aware of their treatment options based on the kind of cancer (or other prostate condition) they have.   Mark B. Saunders is a writer, editor, publisher, public speaker, and 11-year cancer survivor. As an active surveillance prostate cancer patient, Mark did not receive traditional treatment like surgery or some form of radiation. Instead, he dramatically overhauled his lifestyle and his cancer went away and hasn't come back since. As a prostate cancer survivor, Mark has dedicated his life to sharing what he has learned about health and wellness. A journey that he calls, Inside out, round-about, and back again.


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Living Out the Dream



There was one thing that Justin Roberts always dream about becoming and that was a ring announcer for World Wrestling Entertainment. Then it happened. Justin went from playing with action figures of the Ultimate Warrior, the “Heartbreak Kid” Shawn Michaels, Bret “Hitman” Hart and Hulk Hogan to actually announcing these larger-than-life characters. He was living out the dream of many ardent wrestling fans worldwide. Justin tells his inspirational story in Best Seat in the House. You will follow his ambitious journey to becoming a full-time ring announcer at WWE. For over a decade he performed all over the world announcing television shows, weekly live events, and pay-per-view spectaculars which are popular beyond belief.  Not only did he announce the top wrestlers in sports entertainment from “Nature Boy” Ric Flair, “Rowdy” Roddy Piper, Sgt. Slaughter, King Kong Bundy and the Iron Sheik to Dwayne “the Rock” Johnson, “Stone Cold” Steve Austin, John Cena, Brock Lesnar, CM Punk, Chris Jericho and the Undertaker, Justin also relives entertaining and candid moments with his real-life superhero co-workers, workplace politics, grueling travel schedules, harsh requirements of WWE talent, and the overall pitiless treatment from the higher-ups whose decisions can affect nearly the entire wrestling industry. This book is the all-access backstage pass for those who have always wondered what it would be like to work at WWE under the infamous Vince McMahon and travel all over the world in cars, buses and planes with the biggest stars of professional wrestling. Justin Roberts pulls no punches and gives you an uncensored, raw look at the journey of a young man chasing, catching and living his dream. You can pick up your copy of Best Seat in the House here or wherever fine books are sold. Best Seat in the House is published by Meyer & Meyer Sport 2017, and distributed by Cardinal Publishers Group. For more information on our books and services, you can contact us here or call 317-352-8200. As a full service national book distributor Cardinal Publishers Group has been honored to serve many independent book publishers since 2000. It has been our mission to help our independent presses bridge the gap between content and reader. Brought to you by CPG News & Information Services    


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Be Prepared Be Concentrated



By Lamar Lowery You must be prepared for any situation. You also must have good concentration. Be prepared. Be concentrated. Here’s why. Big muscles may look great, but they are not really ideal for anything besides being able to lift heavy stuff. Functional fitness training can prepare you for the unexpected and lower your risk of injury during those activities. Physical altercations, climbing things, lifting yourself up, and running around are all kinds of situations where this type of training can benefit you. Have you ever wondered what kind of training Special Forces soldiers do? You guessed it: functional training. And there’s a good reason for doing so. The fact of the matter is: Navy SEALs or Army Rangers could not care less how much they bench or curl because they know that when it comes down to it, they need to be able to out run, out maneuver, and out last their enemies. Now I’m not saying that these guys never bench or do curls like the rest of us, but A LOT of their training is definitely functional. Oh, not to mention the 60 pounds of gear they have to carry around at all times. Yeah, there isn’t really a specific back workout that will prepare you for that. Being fit allows you to function as your best  you.     Lamar Lowery is the author of Functional Fitness. This book provides intense workouts to reach maximum results. Detailed descriptions and photos make this an easy-to-understand guide for any personal trainer. In Lamar’s personal training sessions, he uses his expertise in endurance, coordination, and biomechanics to receive the best result.   Lamar was born in New York City and received sports scholarships for multiple colleges. He graduated as a Mental Health Specialist. In the late 1980s, he was transferred to a U.S. Army base in Germany. There he worked as an Army Physical Fitness Master. After he left the Army, he decided to stayed in Germany and built his own fitness academy.  


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Program Yourself for Success



Program yourself for success... From Jeff Galloway's book, Mental Training for Runners, Meyer & Meyer Sport, 2016 When I told her I was writing a book on motivation, my wife Barbara asked “for what do you want to be motivated?” At first, most runners tend to answer with specifics: to finish a long run in the upright position, to run faster at a given distance, to finish ahead of a sister, neighbor, age group competitor, to qualify for Boston, or, my favorite, to enjoy every run. The specific goal helps the runner maintain cognitive focus at the beginning of a goal-oriented program. the major challenge in maintaining motivation is maintaining focus as the workouts become more routine and the stress increases. A successful mental training program will reduce stress to a manageable level so that almost every run can bring joy and personal empowerment. The stage is then set for planning a realistic approach to your goal. Have a goal for each run. This cognitive mental action can activate the executive brain as the warm-up switches on the good attitude circuit. As you think about each aspect of the workout, you can keep the human brain in charge. Without such focus, mental action will often drift under the control of the monkey brain which turns negative under stress and releases hormones that stimulate negative messages, such as “I’m too busy to run,” “I’ll get too tired,” “It’s not my day,” and “Why am I doing this?” "I can do it!" So by acknowledging the stress, maintaining mental focus, and using mantras when needed, you’ll produce positive peptides each step of the workout. The next step is to set up an ongoing mental training program that will “run you through” the anticipated challenges each day through a series of doable steps. This will desensitize you to the negative messages, while also giving you a plan with thoughts and words that will help you stay in the frontal lobe during that workout. As you refine and repeat the plan, you reprogram the brain to continue under adversity. This improves your sense of belief in the system, which will stimulate positive attitude circuits and hormones.   Jeff Galloway was an average teenage runner who kept learning and working harder, until he became an Olympian. He is the author of the best selling running book, Galloway's Book on Running, and is a Runners World columnist, in addition to being an inspirational speaker. Jeff is the creator of the Run Walk Run® method and has authored  over 20 books on running, on of which is The Run Walk Run Method.    This blog was brought to you by CPG News & Information Services. For further details, please contact us or give us a call at 317-352-8200


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Staying Relentlessly Positive



By Gary Dudney There comes a point in any race, or for that matter in performing any hard-fought task, when fear and self-doubt creep into your thinking and your inner dialogue turns negative. “I can’t keep this up. I didn’t train hard enough for this. The pain is unbearable. I’m not going to make it. I’m going to fail.” Allow these thoughts to continue and they will undermine you, sap your will, and become a self-fulfilling prophecy. Anxious over failing, runners often tense up making it even harder to move smoothly through a full stride. That is why sport psychologist JoAnn Dahlkoetter in her book, Your Performing Edge, advises athletes to “stay relentlessly positive.”  One technique I learned from her book has helped me stay positive and determined to reach my goal in races of all distances and has even given me a tool for getting through difficult situations in other areas of my life. The technique involves getting to that moment in a race when you feel absolutely at your worst. The fatigue and pain have become overwhelming. Your energy is gone. Every step is a monumental effort. What now? Don’t pretend it’s not happening or try to ignore it. That will only make it worse. What you need to do is acknowledge what you’re feeling. Face up to it and then tell yourself, “Okay, this is how it feels when I’m really trying my hardest, doing my best, reaching for my goal. This is actually normal. This is how it is supposed to feel.” In other words, make how you’re feeling, as horrible as that might be, a positive thing. Take the worst moment in the race and turn it upside down. After all, it’s not supposed to be comfortable. Achieving almost anything worth having is going to be a struggle and so you’re just feeling what that struggle is like in running. In my book, The Tao of Running: Your Journey to Mindful and Passionate Running, I illustrate this technique and many others that will help you get through the toughest parts of your run. I also talk about how to see your running as a journey of self-discovery and how to get the most out of your running experiences. Staying relentlessly positive works well for running, and you’re likely to find, for just about everything else.   Gary Dudney is the author of The Tao of Running: Your Journey to Mindful and Passionate Running,  a fresh and unique perspective to the mental side of the topic of running. It offers readers multiple ways to significantly deepen, enlighten, and enrich their running experiences.   Brought to you by CPG News and Information Services 


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Read the Movie Watch the Book



By Paget Hines Many students are currently reading one of the most ACCLAIMED novels of all time: The Great Gatsby. F. Scott Fitzgerald’s legendary portrait of the EXTRAVAGANCE of the LIBERTINE 1920s is a staple of high school English classes. Many students find that watching the movie provides a deeper understanding of the book. Director Baz Luhrmann’s AUDACIOUS version , starring Leonardo DiCaprio as Jay Gatsby, the ENIGMATIC millionaire, and Carey Mulligan as Daisy Buchanan, the object of his obsession and the CATALYST of his quest for material wealth is available to stream online. Luhrmann has a PENCHANT for stunning spectacle in all of his movies, and his version of The Great Gatsby is no exception. With a star-studded soundtrack, ORNATE costumes and sets, and 3D cinematography, Luhrmann creates a striking EVOCATION of New York at the ZENITH of the Roaring ‘20s. One of Luhrmann’s most compelling and controversial choices in this latest adaptation is his use of ANACHRONISTIC music. The soundtrack includes contributions from an ECLECTIC assortment of popular artists, from hip hop and dance stars like Jay-Z, Beyoncé, André 3000, will.i.am, and Fergie to indie darlings like Gotye, Jack White, Lana Del Rey, Sia, and Florence + The Machine. The soundtrack’s MELODRAMATIC slow songs invoke a sense of Gatsby’s almost WISTFUL yearning to recapture the past. While the soundtrack is INDISPUTABLY contemporary, it often JUXTAPOSES the 1920s with the 2000s. The music of The Great Gatsby’s soundtrack works with the dazzling cinematography to overwhelm the movie audience with the OPULENCE and HEDONISTIC excesses of the Jazz Age. This film adaptation will bring to life Fitzgerald’s SCINTILLATING novel. When watching a film production of a classic novel, it’s useful to view it with a critical eye. Come to your own conclusions about the APTNESS of the casting, the deviations from the novel, and the ultimate success or failure of this translation of the ICONIC novel to the screen. Engaging and entertaining for students. ACCLAIMED—celebrated EXTRAVAGANT—excessive, lacking restraint LIBERTINE—dissolute, free from moral restraints AUDACIOUS—bold ENIGMATIC—mysterious CATALYST—cause of change PENCHANT—preference ORNATE—elaborate and expensive EVOCATION—imaginative re-creation of something ZENITH—peak ANACHRONISTIC—false assignment of something to a time when it did not exist ECLECTIC—using a variety of sources MELODRAMATIC—overly dramatic WISTFUL—showing longing tinged with melancholy INDISPUTABLY—undeniably JUXTAPOSES—places side by side OPULENCE—wealth HEDONISTIC—devoted to the pursuit of pleasure SCINTILLATING—brilliant, sparkling APTNESS—appropriateness ICONIC—venerated as an object of attention and devotion APPOSITE—relevant, pertinent   Paget Hines is the author of Direct Hits Essential Vocabulary, Direct Hits2016; Direct Hits Core Vocabulary, 6th Edition, Direct Hits 2016; and Direct Hits Advance Vocabulary, 6th Edition, Direct Hits 2016 Paget is a Learning Specialist and the Director of Direct Hits Education. She has worked with students with a diverse range of learning profiles.   Brought to you by CPG News & Information Services


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