Monthly Archives: March 2016


Spring Has Sprung with Healthy Recipes

Spring has Sprung with Healthy Recipes By Laura Theodore Laura Theodore’s Vegan-Ease: An Easy Guide to Enjoying a Plant-Based Diet, offers more than 130 delicious, vegan recipes that are quick and easy to prepare, each complete with nutritional analysis. Enhanced by over 200, full-color photographs, each recipe is ranked with an Ease-Factor to make it easy to choose recipes that fit into any busy schedule. Spring is here! As weather permits, I love to grow my own herbs in containers on my deck. Herbs are also easy to grow in a small garden patch, or if you live in an apartment, a sunny window box will do. Growing your own herbs offers fresh cuttings to cook with all spring and summer long, adding depth of flavor and pizazz to your recipes. I grow herbs like rosemary, parsley, thyme, chives oregano, basil, sage, and spearmint from late April or May to early October. Using fresh herbs in your daily recipes adds great nutrition, while making your food taste delicious! This inviting Grape Tomato, Avocado and Fresh Herb Salad, was inspired by bountiful herbs from my deck garden to create a refreshing salad. Fresh basil and parsley are my “go-to” choices all season, and they are featured front-and-center in this hearty and substantial main dish salad offering. Have a happy, healthy spring! Grape Tomato, Avocado and Fresh Herb Salad Makes 2 to 4 Servings Ease-Factor: Level 1 1 cup cooked and chilled black beans, drained and rinsed (canned are fine!) 8 ounces grape tomatoes, halved 2 medium avocados, seeded, peeled and cubed ¼ cup lightly packed chopped fresh basil 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley 1 clove garlic, minced 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 1/8 teaspoon sea salt, plus more to taste Several grinds of freshly ground pepper, to taste Put all of the ingredients in a medium bowl and toss very gently to combine. Let stand 15 minutes to marry the flavors. Season with salt and pepper, to taste and serve. Photos by David Kaplan "Spring has Sprung with Healthy Recipes" has been brought to you by CPG News & Information.            


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Writing Irish

If I had known what fun it is "Writing Irish," I would have started half a century ago. Maybe I was so slow to go Irish due to my Scots blood. Our bookshelves at home were loaded with Burns, Scott, MacDonald and Stevenson.  Mighty bards and storytellers, but a different branch of the Gaels. But I should have been infected young by all those great Irish authors I read in school -- Swift, Moore, Shaw, Yeats, Joyce -- who kept Literature classes from being dull. And I should have taken clues from all those rowdy Irish newspapermen I worked with as a young journalist, who kept the newsroom alive with eloquence and laughter. It was never dull there, either. Language was music.  But always the slow learner, I was in my seventies and had written a dozen books before I ever came up with an Irishman for a protagonist. I created Paddy Quinn as a lowly Army camp errand boy in the Mexican War, in my novel Saint Patrick's Battalion. Irish immigrants were hated and abused in the United States in those days, and many Irish soldiers deserted the American Army to fight on the side of Catholic Mexico. The boy Quinn saw all that drama happening. Paddy had learned to read, and he scribbled in a diary and a sketchbook, and evolved toward manhood in that war writing, and, therefore, thinking big. He was on the way to becoming a somebody instead of just a scorned servant. And because he was of the bardic Irish race, he had certain characteristic strengths, talents, and weaknesses that made me feel young again. By the end of that novel, I was so hooked on writing Irish that young Quinn grew up to be a famous Civil War correspondent in my next novel, Fire in the Water. It was issued last fall by this publisher -- who happens to be, by the way, a cheery Irishman by the name of Doherty. A Happy Saint Patrick's Day to us all -- with a tip o' the hat to me own St. Andrew.  ~ James Alexander Thom


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A Bit of Bizarre Background Behind Beyond the Ides

READER BEWARE: A Bit of Bizarre Background Behind Beyond the Ides Authors can be a quirky bunch, but Craig McGuire takes things to a new level with his latest book. The following is an excerpt from the “Reader Advisory” prefacing Beyond the Ides – Why March is the Unluckiest Month of All: WARNING! This book will change the way you look at life forever. Relax. It only lasts 31 days of the year. My premise is simple. March is the unluckiest month of all. Go on. Laugh. Roll your eyes. Still, you will walk away with my pebble in your shoe. From this book forth, when bad luck befalls in the mean season, you will glance at the calendar, remember what you read here, and have your own revelation. Much as I did long ago. It was the last day of the longest month of 1999. My run-down one-bedroom in Gravesend, Brooklyn, lightly reeked of mildew from days of grey rains seeping through cracks in old warped windows. Miserable, I sulked on my faded calico couch nursing facial bee stings. Tossing out the trash the day before, I knocked over the pail. Bending down to set the can right, I disturbed a hive, sending a squadron of yellow jackets swarming into the holes in my face. Stumbling, flailing, gagging, jamming fingers into my mouth and nose, the soft-flesh membrane stings brought tears to my eyes. Strange, I later thought, for bees to be out on a cold rainy Brooklyn March morning. The next day watching television in that musty apartment, a startling news report flashed across the screen. A villain viciously assaulted Harlequin heartthrob Fabio, striking him in the face no less. As the bees were stabbing my face the day before, a bird slammed into Fabio’s fabulous smile, mid-ride, aboard the new Apollo's Chariot roller coaster at Busch Gardens Williamsburg. (As of this writing, the video has pulled 431,545 views on YouTube. Trust me, it never gets old.) It starts out pleasantly enough. On hand to christen the coaster, Fabio is bulging out of his light blue cotton button-down, Olympian locks gently ruffling in the breeze. The harness barely restrains his rippling physique, strapped into the front car beside three bubbly beauties bedecked in Roman togas. Our cameraman is not actually on the crowded coaster, so the clip fades out as Fabio’s chiseled chin ascends sunward astride the steel horse he rides. Then it happened. According to an eyewitness, moments after the coaster sped out of camera-view, the diabolical duck struck Fabio’s face with massive force, in the midst of a 210-foot descent screaming at upwards of 73 mph. Fade-in to the next frame. The smile has fled Fabio’s blood-flecked face, giving us his best what-the-hell-just-happened-to-poor-Fabio look. As the coaster slowly crawls into the station, he barely, bravely holds back the tears. The date was March 30, 1999. The ride reopened 15 minutes later, with park officials reassuring media that the incident was an “unpredictable freak accident that has never occurred before.” Those words struck me with the force of a bird to the face as I fingered the wounds of my own “unpredictable freak accident that has never occurred before.” I made the connection. Over the years, my more bizarre mishaps and misadventures had one thing in common. They happened in March. March is the unluckiest month of all. March is endless bad luck for me, from broken noses to stubbed toes, back aches to ankle breaks, sprained knees, lost keys, lost jobs, lost money, lost girlfriends, and really, really bad haircuts. Can you feel me, Vinko? You know Vinko. Anyone who watched pre-cable American television through the 1970s and 1980s knows Vinko Bogataj. His catastrophic crash during a ski-jumping championship in Germany established establishing Vinko as the "Agony of Defeat Guy" from the opening credits of ABC's Wide World of Sports. The date was March 21, 1970. It is not just that Vinko spun through the air like a German bisque doll. Athletes fall and fail all the time. Yet producers plucked Vinko from a pile of thousands of clips, immortalizing him as the modern archetype for losing in sports. Fabio did not just have a bad photo-op. Watch the video. He rode the rest of that ride with parts of a bird impaled in his multi-million-dollar face, whining, whimpering, cursing in Italian, blood flecking the togas of those girls, who had to be tripping. One cannot begin to imagine Fabio’s panic. Oh wait, yes, one can. Caught on camera, it lives forever on YouTube. Being violently birded on a roller coaster guarantees making the five o’clock evening news everywhere. For the first time in my life, I thought, maybe it was not only me. Bad things happen every day, all the time, all year round. May be that there are months with even more tragedies than March. March, however, is the unluckiest month of all. Now I am no scientist, psychologist, or sociologist. This fear of March, this is just my thing. Yet for years, often when I share my thing with people, it becomes their thing. Is luck, or bad luck, random? From the German (gelücke), Slavic (lukyj) and Russian (luchaj), the concept of luck is rooted in destiny and fortune. So perhaps luck is less chance happenstance and more converging circumstance. Not controllable, but maybe luck is predictable, at least on some level. So before you read further, be warned. This book will change the way you look at life for 31 days each year. When the strange season comes, something will happen. Then my thing will become your thing and you will beware the ides of March forever more! In Beyond the IDES you will find out why March is the unluckiest month of all. That was a bit of bizarre background behind Beyond the Ides. To read more interesting stories of unlucky events taking place in the month of March, pick up your copy of Beyond the Ides.    


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A Tribute to Basketball Great Clyde Lovellette

  Clyde Lovellette Cardinal Publishers Group was greatly saddened by the news of the death of basketball great Clyde Lovellette at the age of 86. Before his passing, his story was captured in the pages of his book, The Story of Basketball Great Clyde Lovellette, Blue River Press 2015. Cardinal Publishers Group Sales and Marketing Manager, Thomas McLean said of Clyde. “He was a great storyteller. He spoke very highly of the University of Kansas, Terre Haute and the NBA.” The following a small peek into Clyde’s story. One of basketball’s all-time greats at every level of the game, Clyde Lovellette grew up in difficult circumstances in Terre Haute, Indiana to become the first player in history to win an NCAA title, an Olympic gold medal, and an NBA championship. A star at every level of the sport, Clyde has been selected into the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Massachusetts, the College Basketball Hall of Fame in Kansas City, the Kansas University Hall of Fame, the Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame, and the Helms Foundation Hall of Fame. In high school, Clyde was twice named All-State in Indiana. After high school, he was the object of one of the first high-profile recruiting battles in college basketball history. He was persuaded to enroll at Kansas University to play legendary coach Phog Allen. With the Jayhawks, Clyde led the Big Seven Conference three times in scoring and led them to the 1952 NCAA title. He led the U.S. Olympic squad in scoring to help win the 1952 Gold Medal in Helsinki, Finland. He followed up his Olympic triumph by joining the Minneapolis Lakers. Those Lakers represented the first professional dynasty, and Clyde earned the first of his three championship rings as a Laker. He had success with the Cincinnati Royals for one year, the Western Division powerhouse St. Louis Hawks for six years, and finished his career playing two years for the Boston Celtics and earning two more championship rings. In the decades following his retirement Clyde had led an interesting and varied life. He was elected sheriff of his hometown county in Indiana; he spent various periods as a city councilman, coached high school basketball on Cape Cod, and advised and taught at-risk youth at the White’s Institute in Wabash, Indiana. Clyde Lovellette was an All-Star basketball player at every level of the game and is a member of the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame, the College Basketball Hall of Fame, the Indiana High School Basketball Hall of Fame, the Kansas Sports Hall of Fame, and the Kansas University Athletic Hall of Fame. Lovellette was an NCAA champion, an NBA champion and won an Olympic gold medal. The book, The Story of Basketball Great Clyde Lovellette was written by Clyde Lovellette along with veteran newspaper sportswriter and author of dozens of book about sports, Lew Freedman. When Lew was a youth he followed Clyde Lovellette’s career with the St. Louis Hawks and Boston Celtics. Lew offered these comments: As someone who got to know Clyde Lovellette personally over the last few years after being aware of his basketball achievements for most of my life, I was very saddened to learn about his passing after a year-long illness.  In the basketball world, Clyde was a winner everywhere he went, in high school in Terre Haute, Indiana, as an NCAA champion at Kansas University, as a member of a United States gold-medal-winning Olympic team, and on three NBA champions.  Clyde Lovellette is the answer to a terrific basketball trivia question. Who is the only college player to lead the country in scoring and win an NCAA championship in the same year? Clyde did that with Kansas in 1952.  


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Happy Anniversary Cardinal Publishers Group!

Happy anniversary Cardinal Publishers Group! Today we turn 16 years old. It seems like only yesterday when Tom and Adriane Doherty launched Cardinal Publishers Group with two lines and five titles. They were packing orders of adult non-fiction books from a small section of a warehouse on the far west side of Indianapolis. Today, our eastside warehouse is buzzing with orders being picked, packed, and shipped out. And we certainly have more than five titles to send. A variety of sports, health and fitness, true crime, business, cookbooks, biographies, fiction and children’s titles from many independent publishers go out of our doors. As a national book distributor since March 10, 2000, Cardinal Publishers Group helps independent publishers enter the book market. We endeavor to provide the best possible full service book distribution to our clients – whether they are big or small. Our book distribution services include sales, warehousing, fulfillment, billing & collection, customer service, digital conversion and distribution, metadata management, and more. We also manage the distribution of both print books and e-books. Additional services include print production, design, and marketing. “It’s been a lot of fun through the years and great to watch the growth of our clients and the many books that we distribute. I’m also thankful for our dedicated, hardworking staff, and our loyal customers,” President of Cardinal Publishers Group, Tom Doherty, reflected. "It's been a great ride and I've enjoyed working with our clients and customers throughout the years." Adriane Doherty shared. “Although many book distributors have warehouses in Indiana, our headquarters and our warehouse is located in Indianapolis, Indiana – the Crossroads of America,” Doherty went on to say proudly. Happy Anniversary Cardinal Publishers Group! To learn more about the books we distribute, have a look at our latest catalog. You can also get more information about us by clicking here. We would love to answer any questions you have, a qualified staff member is ready to help you, give us a call (317)352-8200 or contact us here! Until next time ~ Ginger Bock and the CPG Blog Team


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The Real Science for Younger Skin That Cosmetics Companies Don’t Want You to Know

The Real Science for Younger Skin that Cosmetics Companies Don't Want You to Know ~ Michelle Lee, author of The Young Skin Diet, Salut Studio, April 2016 $2 billion. Every single year. That’s what Americans spend on anti-aging treatments, according to market research by Mintel Group. $2,000,000,000. Each and every year. To put that number into perspective, consider that the total economic output for the Central American country of Belize - that is, all the goods, services, government programs, investments and international trade generated by the country in an entire year - is a bit less. Given how much we spend on all these creams, serums, ointments and pills, most of which are aimed at resolving skin issues, you’d think all our concerns over fine lines, wrinkles, pores, dryness, discoloration and sagging would be long gone. For the overwhelming majority of us, that simply isn’t the case. Why is it that billions of dollars each year can’t solve skin aging problems that are seemingly inevitable? For one, it’s because the creams and pills don’t really address the underlying causes of skin aging. At best, they cover things up or engage in a sort of horse trading: short-term “results” at the expense of long-term skin health. Lots of so-called anti-aging products simply don’t work. Some are entirely ineffectual, and some can even damage your skin. Take products containing tea tree oil, for instance. Tea tree oil seems to be everywhere these days, touted as hydrating, soothing and natural. Well, natural it may be. But soothing it most certainly is not. Tea tree oil is actually a noted skin irritant that can lead to swelling, blistering and redness. I know. I’ve been there with tea tree oil. It’s something best avoided altogether for youthful skin. So where does this leave us? We want our skin’s youthful glow back. We want a clear complexion, smoothness and suppleness. We want to look younger and healthier. My research for The Young Skin Diet revealed the very best way to rejuvenate skin. It’s not commercial creams or prescription drugs. It’s the simple, elegant biochemistry of a strategically assembled diet. So let’s connect the two threads: Are there foods we can eat that give us access to the same “active ingredients” that expensive and risky commercial or prescription products do? Absolutely. And, in fact, the foods do it much better. There are chemicals found in common anti-aging serums and creams that can be important parts of a regimen for younger skin if - and only if - consumed internally as food, and not if applied externally. Hyaluronic acid is one. Hyaluronic acid is a featured active ingredient in products being hawked by several big-name cosmetics companies that promise their creams will hydrate your skin and leave it smoother and younger looking. The products are chic and expensive and very likely to leave you wondering why you didn’t just spend all that money on a tropical vacation to Belize. Or, if not a vacation, then at least a can or two of chickpeas. Chickpeas naturally provide hyaluronic acid, and they do so in a way that allows the chemical to work for your skin - rather than against it. When eaten, hyaluronic acid helps build collagen. And, when eaten, it does promote sustainable, long-term skin hydration. Articles outlining these processes appear in scholarly journals including Wound Repair and Regeneration, detailing the biological impacts of hyaluronic acid in skin. The best results for skin occur with hyaluronic acid when it’s ingested. Here’s why. The hydration effect of hyaluronic acid is brought on because the chemical is a humectant that draws moisture from its environment toward it. This property is excellent for skin when hyaluronic acid arrives internally via the diet since it ushers water toward the inner layers of the skin and plumps skin’s appearance. When applied to the skin externally, though, hyaluronic acid can pull moisture away from the deeper skin layers toward the skin’s surface. That moisture quickly evaporates, leaving only a transitory skin-smoothing benefit that ultimately dries out the skin’s inner layers. Which paves the way for redness, inflammation, fine lines and wrinkles over time. So hyaluronic acid is a great example of why it’s simply better to eat good foods than slather on costly creams. Plus, when derived from chickpeas, the hyaluronic acid gets delivered to the skin along with a dose of silica that boosts collagen-building efforts. There are other chemicals found in costly - often prescription - treatments that also can be obtained from foods to produce great results for skin. Arbutin is a good example since both blueberries and expensive creams are rich in the chemical. Arbutin is a powerful skin lightener that reduces skin pigmentation inconsistencies. As detailed in a 2015 paper published in the International Journal of Cosmetic Science, arbutin is similar in structure (and convertible) to hydroquinone, the active ingredient in various skin-lightening creams. Of course, arbutin consumed courtesy of blueberries entails none of the preservatives or additives found in cosmetic creams, and the amount of arbutin/hydroquinone put to work in the skin when ingested is carefully regulated by your body’s individual biochemistry (i.e., you won’t overload your skin and suffer unintended side-effects that can result from the creams). Blueberries taste a lot better too. The point of all this is that the right selections of foods can provide many of the same “active ingredients” as costly ointments and treatments - only with better results and no nasty side-effects. More broadly, the right foods, when used, combined and prepared strategically, can accelerate exfoliation, build collagen and elastin, soften lines and wrinkles, brighten the complexion, undo UV damage and prevent further sun damage, rebalance hormones that affect skin, and provide alpha-hydroxy acids that peel away unattractive and aged skin, among many other things. They do all this holistically, naturally, without side-effects, inexpensively and in a way that builds great overall health along with more youthful skin. Rather than slather your skin in risky and expensive commercial anti-aging treatments, just sneak a few great-skin foods into your diet. Save your cash. And jet off to Belize for some snorkeling.   To receive more information on how to have and maintain younger skin, pick up a copy of Michelle's newest book, The Young Skin Diet today! Young Skin Diet


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Chocolate Chip, Raisin and Oatmeal Loaf Cake

A great way to celebrate National Pound Cake day is with this vegan alternative by Laura Theodore; an inviting vegan chocolate chip, raisin and oatmeal loaf cake. For more delicious vegan recipes pick up a copy of “Laura Theodore’s Vegan-Ease.” CHOCOLATE CHIP, RAISIN and OATMEAL LOAF CAKE Makes 12 slices Need a treat, but want it to be filling too? This lively loaf makes a wonderful treat when you're seeking something sweet, but you want health benefits too! With a pop of chocolate nestled in a batter of whole wheat flour, rolled oats, sunflower seeds, and raisins, this quick loaf will truly satisfy. Serve slathered with your favorite preserves or bit of nut butter for a satisfying snack. 1 ½ cups whole wheat flour 1 cup plus 1½ tablespoons rolled oats 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/3 cup vegan white sugar 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 cup raisins 1/3 cup vegan (dairy free) dark chocolate chips, (70% or 85% cacao) 1/3 cup raw, unsalted sunflower seeds 1½ cups nondairy, coconut milk beverage, (or your preferred nondairy milk) plus more as needed Preheat the oven to 375°F. Line an 8 x 4-inch loaf pan with unbleached parchment paper, leaving a 1½ -inch overhang on the two long sides of the pan. Put the whole wheat flour, 1 cup rolled oats, and baking powder in a large bowl, and stir with a dry whisk to combine. Add the sugar and cinnamon, and stir with the whisk to combine. Stir in the raisins, chocolate chips, and sunflower seeds, and stir to combine. Add the coconut beverage and stir until well blended, adding a bit more coconut beverage, as needed, if the mixture seems dry. Batter will be thick. Spoon the batter into the prepared loaf pan, smoothing the top with a rubber spatula. Sprinkle 1½ tablespoons of rolled oats evenly over the top of the bread. Bake for 40 to 45 minutes, until the top of the bread is firm, slightly golden, and a toothpick inserted in the center of the bread comes out clean. Put the bread on a wire rack and let cool for five minutes. Using the parchment paper “wings,” carefully lift the bread from the pan and put it on the wire rack. Carefully peel back the paper from the sides of the bread and let cool an additional 10 to 15 minutes before slicing. Serve warm, or wrap tightly, refrigerate, and serve cold. Wrapped tightly and stored in the refrigerator, bread will keep for 3 days. Photo by Laura Theodore. Recipe taken from Laura Theodore’s Vegan-Ease. Reproduced by kind permission of Laura Theodore. Visit Laura on Facebook and follow her on Twitter for daily recipes and tips for serving delicious, plant-based meals.


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