Monthly Archives: August 2015


This Month in Yankee History – August

August 2015 / 1976, 1973, 1979 This Day in Yankee History Let's take a look at this month in Yankee history - August. Catchers are often the closest thing to true warriors in baseball and Thurman Munson was one of those guys. Munson was a good hitter, an excellent fielder, and a great leader. Every good team must have one and Munson filled that role for the Yankees. As an illustration of that the 5-foot-11, 190-pound Munson was anointed team captain of the club in 1976. It was the first time the Yankees named a captain since Lou Gehrig completed his New York career in 1939. Munson grew up in Ohio, played at Kent State, was a high draft of the Yankees in 1968, and spent only one season in the minors.  By August of 1979 Munson had been selected to seven All-Star teams. He broke into the majors in 1969 with a brief showing, but was rookie of the year in 1970. In 1976, Munson was the American League’s MVP. Six times he hit at least 10 home runs in a season, with a high of 20 in 1973. As of early August of 1979, Munson had appeared in 97 games for the Yankees and was batting .288. He was in his 11th season with the club. A proud man Munson was often compared to Boston’s Carlton Fisk as one of the two best catchers in the American League, and to Johnny Bench of the Cincinnati Reds, in a debate over who was the best of the trio in Major League baseball.  Munson wore a walrus mustache and could be gruff in his relations with sportswriters. Unlike some earlier generations of Yankees, Munson could not count on playing in the World Series every year. But he helped make New York good enough for the Yankees to appear in three Series in a row between 1976 and 1978. Whether it was the American League Championship Series or the World Series, Munson was always clutch in the playoffs. His lifetime average in three of each of those types of series was .378. In the ’76 World Series versus Cincinnati Munson batted .529  ...And that is what happened this month in Yankee history - August.   Bronx Bomber will not only cover the great hitters and their hitting careers, it will also cover many of the iconic home runs. Excerpted from Bronx Bombers: Yankee Home Run History by Lew Freedman published by Blue River Press and distributed by Cardinal Publishers Group. For more of Yankee home run history, pick up your copy of Bronx Bomber today. Brought to you by CPG News & Information      


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Living Luxe Gluten Free

By Michelle Lee, author of Living Luxe Gluten-Free Football season's just around the corner...so don't let Deflategate take the wind out of your snacking sails! Try these gluten-free Buffalo Tenders for full-blown flavor and prep so easy even Roger Goodell could make 'em! NO BONES ABOUT ‘EM BUFFALO TENDERS SAUCE 6+ tbsp. hot sauce (I prefer Frank’s, but just use your favorite allergy-friendly hot sauce) 4 tsp. lactose-free butter, room temperature (I like Earth Balance Natural Buttery Spread) 1 tsp. white balsamic vinegar
Cayenne pepper (to taste)
Garlic powder (to taste) TENDERS ½ cup gluten-free all-purpose flour ½ cup gluten-free breadcrumbs (I like Glutino Original Bagel Chips, crushed) 1 tsp. ground black pepper ½ tsp. salt ½ tsp. smoked paprika 1 cup canola oil 1 lb. boneless, skinless chicken breast tenders 1 egg, lightly beaten in a wide, shallow bowl STEPS 1. Mix sauce ingredients in a small bowl and set aside. 2. Mix flour, breadcrumbs, pepper, salt, and paprika in a wide, shallow bowl or plate and set aside. 3. In a large, deep skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat until it begins to shimmer. Working in batches, dredge chicken in egg and then in flour and breadcrumb mixture. Place coated chicken in skillet and cook until outsides of chicken are dark brown and meat is cooked through, about 5 minutes per side. 4. Place cooked chicken pieces on a paper towel-lined plate to drain. 5. When all tenders have been cooked, pour sauce over tenders and toss to coat thoroughly. Serve immediately. TIP If you’re not a fan of hot sauce, prepare tenders according to the recipe and use a gluten-free dipping sauce, such as Trader Joe’s Sweet Chili Sauce or Trader Joe’s Mango Chutney, in place of the hot sauce. Barbecue sauce is a great option as well. Recipe from Living Luxe Gluten Free (Salut Studio, 2015). Presented to you by CPG News & Information


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Self Deposit Box

By Dick Wolfsie, author The Right Fluff (Blue River Press 2014) and Mopey Dick (Blue River Press 2011) The following is an excerpt from The Right Fluff used by permission of Blue River Press). Self Deposit Box The other day, this personal relationship I have with this wonderful staff was threatened by some new technology. Apparently, I no longer have to visit the bank several times a week to make deposits. Instead I can do it by simply clicking a photo of the check with my smart phone, a transaction that can be completed in the privacy of my home. All I needed to do was download an app, regardless that it would seriously cut into the quality time I spend with the only four people in Indiana who, at 9:05 in the morning, find me even mildly amusing. "YOU WILL LAUGH YOUR BUNS OFF" Richard Simmons, celebrity fitness guru "DICK WOLFSIE MAY BE THE FUNNIEST MAN IN INDIANA" Mark Katz, humorist, and author of Clinton & Me: A Real Life Political Comedy I couldn’t wait to try this. My wife was very suspicious of the new system as she often is of high-tech stuff. But I convinced her this was perfectly safe, comparing the process to making deposits at an ATM. “Think of the app like a pneumatic tube at the drive-up window,” I told her. I didn’t have a clue what that meant. Ditto, Mary Ellen. “Hold the check steady and I’ll take a photo of it,” I instructed my wife, as I grabbed the camera phone. “Not the way I look, Dick. Wait until I put on some make-up.” “You’re not going to be in the picture Mary Ellen. They only want the check.” “Don’t they need a photo ID?” “Very funny. Okay, I’ll hold the check at arm’s length and snap it myself.” I handed the cell phone immediately to my wife for her approval. “Is that a good picture of the check?” I asked. “No, but it’s a great photo of your thumb. At least I hope it’s your thumb.” I was determined to do this correctly, so I taped the check to the fridge, stood back and tried again. I didn’t get quite what I wanted, but I now had a great shot of me staring blankly at a refrigerator door. This selfie thing could catch on. I tried a few more times, but I kept getting error messages that my photos were fuzzy, the camera wasn’t steady, or the amount wasn’t legible. I never got this kind of flak from Brad, Sarah, Miranda or John at the bank, so why was I putting myself through this? I went back to my branch and told the entire staff that I preferred their outstanding customer service to using some cell phone gadgetry. I plan to continue banking there on a regular basis. Unless I can find an app that will laugh at my jokes. Dick Wolfsie is the world s cheeriest curmudgeon.                    


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Huckabee called for Pollard’s release in 2011

By Elliot Goldenberg, author of Spy of David Long a friend of Israel – in contrast, many believe, to Barack Obama – Republican presidential hopeful Mike Huckabee jumped on the free Jonathan Pollard bandwagon back in 2011, following the lead of Philip B. Heymann and others. Huckabee called for Pollard's release. On January 26 of that year, as noted in Spy of David, Gil Hoffman reported in the Jerusalem Post that Heymann, a former U.S deputy attorney general, had requested that President Obama release Pollard. According to Hoffman, Heymann – the James Barr Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, author of two books on terrorism, and the director of Harvard Law School’s International Center for Criminal Justice – became the first U.S. official to state he had reviewed Pollard’s complete record and found no evidence that he helped America’s enemies. Heymann also became the second senior Harvard Law School professor to write Obama, asking him to commute Pollard’s life sentence to the more than twenty-five years he had already served. The first, Hoffman noted, was Charles Ogletree, who was a mentor to both the president and his wife, Michelle.   “Having already served a severe sentence, Pollard is now supported by political and religious leaders across the political spectrum in seeking a commutation,” Heymann wrote in a letter to the president. “I join them with deep conviction as to the justice of their shared cause.” At the same time, Pollard would soon pick up another supporter – perhaps his most important ally, yet. That new ally, Mike Huckabee, the former governor of Arkansas who had come up short in his 2008 bid for the presidency, but is now making another run at the White House, arrived in Israel in late January 2011 with actor Jon Voight. They both met with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.  On February 1 the Jerusalem Post reported that Voight called Pollard’s life sentence “beyond injustice,” and “a clear case of anti-Semitism.” According to the Jerusalem Post, Huckabee stated that, as a gesture of friendship to Israel, President Obama should commute Pollard’s sentence. “Right now,” Huckabee said, “we don’t need anything that reflects that we are anything but an absolute ally of Israel. would send the right message to the rest of the world: that America is not pulling back on its friendship and relationship with Israel, but it is accelerating it and making sure that we are taking every step possible to solidify those bonds.” It is finally happening. Pollard is scheduled to be released from prison on or before November 21, 2015, the thirtieth anniversary of his arrest. ~Elliot Goldenberg Now, twenty-five years later, the debate over America’s most controversial spy has again been rekindled.        


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This Day in Yankee History – August 6, 1920

If you were wondering what took place this day, August 6th, in Yankee history, you've come to the right place. Below is an excerpt from Lew Freedman's book, Bronx Bombers: New York Yankees Home Run History, and we wanted to share with you what happened this day in Yankee history. Bronx Bomber will not only cover the great hitters and their hitting careers, it will also cover many of the iconic home runs. There’s nothing like hitting it big in New York, the media capital of the world, and Babe Ruth discovered a way to hit it big that was brand new – by hitting a baseball in a bigger way than anyone else ever had. Ruth showed up at Yankee Stadium, hit home runs, and in an era before baseball teams played night games, he partied the night away. In a famous comment, when newspapermen probed Ruth’s roommate Ping Bodie to ask what the big man was like, Bodie replied, “I don’t know anything about him. I don’t room with him. I room with his suitcase.” Ruth actually began the 1920 season slowly because of a pulled muscle. But then he blasted 11 home runs in May. Up until shortly before that figure would have been sufficient to lead the league for a season. That was the most any player had ever hit in a month. Of course, in June Ruth hit 13 to break his 30-day-old record.  The Babe passed 30 home runs – breaking his one-year-old record of 29 – on July 19. In the second game of a double-header against the Chicago White Sox, Ruth went 2-for-3 with three RBIs and two homers, leaving him at 31 at the end of the day.  Ruth passed 40 home runs in the same manner on August 6. He ripped two homers in an 11-7 victory over the Detroit Tigers, leaving him at 41 upon completion of that game. Ruth notched his historic 50th home run on September 24 against the Washington Senators at the Polo Grounds. However, it came in a loss as the slumping Yankees played themselves out of the pennant race. It was the first game of a double-header which Washington won, 3-1. The pitcher was Jose Acosta, who in a rarity for the time, was from Cuba. The right-hander pitched parts of three seasons in the majors and finished 10-10.  Excerpted from Bronx Bombers: New York Yankees Home Run History by Lew Freedman published by Blue River Press and distributed by Cardinal Publishers Group. For more of Yankee home run history, pick up your copy of Bronx Bomber today.


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